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STEM Education

FYI covers federal policies and programs focused on K-12, undergraduate, graduate, and informal education in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields, including those supported by the Department of Education, National Science Foundation, and NASA.

 
25 Apr 2000

"The appropriations express" is how a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) describes the Senate in May. If all goes as scheduled, appropriations bills funding the Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, NASA, and the National Science Foundation will be written during the next five weeks. Now is the time to contact your representative and two senators about these funding bills for FY 2001.

 
18 Feb 2000

Many federal department and agency budgets contain some funding for science and math education activities. However, the major efforts on science and math education are conducted by the Department of Education and the National Science Foundation. Information on the FY 2001 budget request for science and math education within the Department of Education is provided below. Details of the request for NSF's Education and Human Resources Activity will be provided in a subsequent FYI.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION:

 
8 Apr 1999

In the Senate, authorizing legislation for Department of Education programs, including those focusing on science and math education, is drafted by the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. The National Science Foundation also funds programs in science and math education; authorizing legislation for NSF is under the jurisdiction of the Senate Commerce Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space. Below is the roster for the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions for the 106th Congress.

 
8 Apr 1999

The Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies is responsible for writing an appropriations bill that funds, among other agencies, the Department of Education. Below is the roster for this subcommittee for the 106th Congress. Information on rosters comes from Congressional Quarterly. See http://www.senate.gov/senators/index.cfmfor the Web sites of all senators.

 
8 Apr 1999

The House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies is responsible for writing an appropriations bill that funds, among other agencies, the Department of Education. Below is the roster for this subcommittee for the 106th Congress. Included with each subcommittee member's name is a list of the higher education institutions in his or her district. Information on rosters and university/college listings comes from Congressional Quarterly.

 
11 Jan 1996

"Implementing the [Standards] is a large and significant process
that will extend over many years....  Change will occur locally,
and differences in individuals, schools, and communities will
produce different pathways to reform....  Nevertheless, with the
common vision of the Standards, we can expect deliberate movement
over time, leading to reform that is pervasive and permanent." 
      -- National Science Education Standards

 
28 Oct 2014

Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ) has asked his colleagues in the House of Representatives to support greater flexibility in how states could utilize Department of Education funding to encourage and support prospective STEM teachers.   

 
17 Jul 1997

Yesterday, the Senate passed its version of a funding bill for the Department of Energy. Although tradition dictates that the House mark up appropriations bills first, Senate appropriators, anxious to make progress before the August recess, drafted their own Energy and Water Development bill (S. 1004) rather than wait to receive the House version.

 
3 Jul 1997

The latest findings from the most recent international comparison of grade-school math and science achievement reveals some more optimistic results for the U.S. than earlier data. The first report based on the "Third International Mathematical and Science Study" (TIMSS), released in November, focused on eighth-graders (see FYI #159, 1996.) It showed that U.S. eighth-graders ranked slightly below the international average in math, and slightly above in science.

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