FYI Bulletin is a news service covering science policy developments in Washington, DC, with a focus on the physical sciences.

 
25 Jan 1993

On December 15, Rep. George Brown (D-California), chairman of the
House Science Committee, sent a letter to DOE Secretary Admiral
James Watkins, requesting detailed information on the status of the
Superconducting Super Collider.  Watkins responded in a letter
dated January 14, just 7 days before he was replaced as Energy
Secretary by Hazel O'Leary.  The 27-page letter, while mostly
restating Bush Administration positions, serves as a good summation
of the project's current status and will probably be used in

 
22 Jan 1993

The U.S. Senate approved yesterday the nomination of Hazel R.
O'Leary as the new Secretary of Energy.  This vote came just two
days after O'Leary appeared before the Senate Energy and Natural
Resources Committee.

O'Leary, 55, has been executive vice president for corporate
affairs at the Minnesota-based Northern States Power Company.
During the Carter Administration she worked in a senior position at
the Federal Energy Administration.

 
22 Jan 1993

Members have been named to the subcommittees of the House
Appropriations Committee for the 103rd Congress.  Of major interest
to scientists and science educators is the Subcommittee on
Veterans' Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, and Independent
Agencies, which has jurisdiction over funding for the National
Science Foundation and NASA.  On the other side of Capitol Hill,
the Senate has determined the membership of its major committees,
but it has not yet announced final subcommittee assignments. 

 
20 Jan 1993

Following new House rules for the 103rd Congress designed to reduce
the proliferation of subcommittees, the House Science, Space and
Technology Committee has been reorganized.  Its six subcommittees
have been reduced to five.  It retains unchanged its subcommittees
on Science, Space, Energy, and Investigations and Oversight.  The
Environment subcommittee was eliminated, and most of its
jurisdiction taken over by the Technology and Competitiveness
subcommittee, now renamed the Subcommittee on Technology,
Environment, and Aviation.

 
15 Jan 1993

"...I have had the opportunity to work on a wide range of issues as
the Assistant to President Bush for Science and Technology, but
none has been more important to me than those issues involving the
health of this nation's research-intensive universities."
                                           - D. Allan Bromley

 
14 Jan 1993

On December 24, President-elect Clinton nominated John H. "Jack"
Gibbons to be Assistant to the President for Science and
Technology, and Director of the White House Office of Science and
Technology Policy (OSTP).  Gibbons has served as Director of the
Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), a bipartisan research arm of
the US Congress, for over a decade. 

 
14 Jan 1993

"When I assumed responsibility as Secretary of Energy four years
ago, the Department was a rudderless ship."
                           - DOE Secretary Admiral James Watkins

So began the 48-page 1993 "Posture Statement" distributed at the
January 8 meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board.  The
statement and meeting discussion summarized DOE's accomplishments,
and yet unresolved issues.

 
8 Jan 1993

On January 6, the Department of Energy and the Russian Federation
Ministry of Atomic Energy signed an agreement to collaborate on the
Superconducting Super Collider.  According to Secretary of Energy
Admiral James Watkins, the Russians will help with the "design,
engineering and production of two of the project's booster
accelerators." 

 
7 Jan 1993

Trying to characterize science policy developments in physics and
astronomy in 1992 is difficult at best.  Some projects continued to
receive significant budget increases while other facilities were
closed.  Department and agency budgets had uneven growth.  Despite
the ups and downs in federal funding, new attention was given to
scientific advances as a key component of a national economic
strategy.  Here are some of the major physics and astronomy policy
developments in 1992:

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION:

 
5 Jan 1993

At noon today the first session of the 103rd Congress convened.
This will be a dynamic year in Washington, with significant changes
on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.  Much of what occurs during
these next twelve months will have profound implications for the
physics and astronomy community.

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