Reports, reviews, and assessments

 
10 Feb 1993

The National Science Foundation has released a 84-page report
entitled "National Patterns of R&D Resources: 1992" providing
important data on selected R&D trends.  A product of the Division
of Science Resources Studies, this document is the latest in a
series of NSF reports monitoring science and technology spending.

Highlights of the report's major findings (some of which are
approximations/estimations/expectations) follow.  All are adjusted
for inflation:

 
29 Jan 1993

The 103 Congress is now underway.  As future FYIs report on and
analyze congressional actions throughout the year, the following
list of congressional terminology might be of use to readers:

 
15 Jan 1993

"...I have had the opportunity to work on a wide range of issues as
the Assistant to President Bush for Science and Technology, but
none has been more important to me than those issues involving the
health of this nation's research-intensive universities."
                                           - D. Allan Bromley

 
7 Jan 1993

Trying to characterize science policy developments in physics and
astronomy in 1992 is difficult at best.  Some projects continued to
receive significant budget increases while other facilities were
closed.  Department and agency budgets had uneven growth.  Despite
the ups and downs in federal funding, new attention was given to
scientific advances as a key component of a national economic
strategy.  Here are some of the major physics and astronomy policy
developments in 1992:

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION:

 
5 Jan 1993

At noon today the first session of the 103rd Congress convened.
This will be a dynamic year in Washington, with significant changes
on both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue.  Much of what occurs during
these next twelve months will have profound implications for the
physics and astronomy community.

 
2 Dec 1994

Setting milestones and measuring achievement are Clinton
Administration watchwords for science and technology policy.  A
recent example is a September 1994 progress report on the National
Information Infrastructure (NII), issued by Commerce Secretary Ron
Brown, who chairs the interagency Information Infrastructure Task
Force (IITF).  The NII is a favorite project of Vice President
Gore, who says in the report's preface, "This seamless web of
communications networks including computers, televisions,

 
22 Nov 1994

On August 2, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) released a
report entitled "Indirect Costs for R&D at Higher Education
Institutions: Annotated Chronology of Major Federal Policies."  The
33-page report provides a history of the federal government's
policies on indirect cost reimbursement from the World War II era
to the present day.  Below is a summary of the report:

 
2 Nov 1994

The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) has just completed a
several-year analysis of the US's civilian remote sensing and Earth
observing systems.  This examination, requested by the House and
Senate committees with responsibility for these programs, has
produced three reports.  The final report, "Civilian Satellite
Remote Sensing: A Strategic Approach," (OTA-ISS-607) was released
on October 28.  (The other reports in the series are "The Future of
Remote Sensing from Space: Civilian Satellite Systems and

 
7 Sep 1994

The House has passed H.R. 4908, the Hydrogen, Fusion, and High
Energy and Nuclear Physics Research Act of 1994.  Included in this
bill is Title IV -- Miscellaneous Provisions, which deals
exclusively with "University Radiation Science and Technology."
This bill only authorizes DOE activity in this area; funding is
provided separately in appropriations legislation.

 
22 Aug 1994

Interspersed throughout the 31-page report recently released by the
Office of Science and Technology Policy are examples of science in
the national interest, which is also the title of the document.
Early on in the report, the authors state, "Vibrant scientific
disciplines are best guaranteed by the initiatives of talented
investigators and in turn provide the strongest and most enduring
foundation for science in the national interest.  That quantum
theory would lead to today's electronics, or investigations of DNA

Pages

Subscribe to Reports,  reviews, and assessments