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Visibility   Visibility & Representation

Guarantee a seat at the table.

Representation in Washington, DC is critical to ensure you have a voice.

AIP will help increase your visibility with key decision makers in Congress, federal agencies, the White House and within the science policy community in DC.

Types of services include:

  • Organize group Congressional visit days
  • Represent your society at community meetings
  • Arrange Executive Branch meetings
  • Schedule Congressional visits for society leadership
  • Design Congressional briefings and events

Case Study

Congressional Visits: Training Physics Students to Engage with Their Representatives

duckworth-visit.jpg

Felipe Gomez del Campo, founder and CEO of FGC Plasma Solutions, Chain Reaction Innovations Entrepreneurship fellow at Argonne National Lab, and student at  Case Western Reserve University, meeting with Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois.

Felipe Gomez del Campo, founder and CEO of FGC Plasma Solutions, Chain Reaction Innovations Entrepreneurship fellow at Argonne National Lab, and student at  Case Western Reserve University, meeting with Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois.  Credit: AIP

Congress places a high value on groups and citizens who have built relationships with the legislator and staff. During our over 20 years of experience planning and executing group Congressional visit day events, we have found that Congresspeople are especially willing to talk directly with students.

At one recent event, we made 29 Congressional visits, including 11 meetings with Member of Congress for a group of 10 students from the Society of Physics Students. We provided our signature science policy pre-event training that includes: guidance through the federal budget and appropriations process, teaching storytelling techniques to help communicate their personal story of challenges and successes, and scheduled opportunities to develop relationships with members of their congressional delegation.

Many policymakers on Capitol Hill are interested in improving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) learning, but may not have exposure to recent examples of high-impact practices. Students can help provide these examples and can help foster an understanding of the critical role science plays within their universities.

 

Testimonials

I have a deeper understanding of how things work and learned how to make an impact.”

-- Student participant