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Department of Energy

In covering DOE’s science-related activities, FYI focuses on the Office of Science, including its six program offices and 10 national laboratories. FYI also covers the Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy and the science-related activities of the National Nuclear Security Administration, including its three national laboratories.

4 Jun 2012

Late  last week the House of Representatives started its consideration of the FY 2013  Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill.  It is expected that the final vote on passage  will occur later this week.

23 Jun 2014

Last week the House Appropriations Committee approved its version of the FY 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill.  In several sections of the committee’s report accompanying this bill the appropriations take a strong position on the Obama Administration’s policy regarding the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository.

23 Jun 2014

The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee held a hearing on June 12 to focus on the threat of crude explosives using radiological materials and efforts to secure these materials.  The hearing drew on a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, Nuclear Nonproliferation: Additional Actions Needed to Increase the Security of U.S.

20 Jun 2014

On Wednesday the House Appropriations Committee approved the FY 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill.  The $34 billion bill provides funding for the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) which received $11.4 billion.
 

19 Jun 2014

The House Appropriations Committee has approved an FY 2015 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Bill.  The $34 billion bill provides funding for the Department of Energy, including the Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration.  During yesterday’s markup session a few amendments were considered to the bill developed by Energy and Water Development Appropriations Subcommittee; none affected funding levels for the Office of Science.

18 Jun 2014

At last week’s hearing of the House Energy Subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee on the report by the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5), Rep. Randy Hultgren (R-IL) entered into the record a letter by Malcolm Beasley, President of the American Physical Society (APS).  The APS is a Member Society of the American Institute of Physics.

17 Jun 2014

Last week the House Energy Subcommittee of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee held a hearing to review a report by the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5).  Subcommittee members gave the witnesses a positive reception, complimenting them and the particle physics community for developing a consensus document that will guide the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation in making strategic decisions about the field in the coming decade and beyond.

9 Apr 2012

Frank Rusco, Director of Natural Resources and Environment at  the Government Accountability Office (GAO), recently drafted a report on the  Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science’s (SC) use of a multilayered  process for prioritizing research.  This  February 2012 report, prepared for Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Ranking  Member of the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development of the Senate  Appropriations Committee, reviewed SC’s research priorities, explained how  those priorities were established, and offered a description of the  coordination between SC and other federal ag

7 Mar 2012

Energy  Secretary Steven Chu testified before two important panels in the last week:  the House Energy and Water Development Appropriations Subcommittee and the  House Science, Space, and Technology Committee.   As expected, most questions centered on energy prices and nuclear waste  disposal, and to a lesser degree, DOE’s science programs.

1 Mar 2012

“If  this isn’t fixed we’re going to lose the capability of these laboratories.  This has just got to be fixed . . . the  stakes are very, very high here.”  So  warned Charles Curtis, a member of a National Research Council committee  charged with reviewing the management and the conduct of scientific research  and engineering at the three National Security Laboratories. 

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